Local Plans

This Local Plan has been developed to communicate the priorities – and actions -  for supporting the local community as it responds to changes in land use, water policy reform, climate and farm production.

There are six regions – or social-ecological systems (SES) – identified in the Goulburn Broken Regional Catchment Strategy 2013 - 2019 (RCS), which guides efforts to sustain and restore the natural environment that underpins our way of life, wellbeing, prosperity and future.

Each SES is made up of communities and landscapes that share similar characteristics and issues that give them a unique identity.

Local Plans have been developed for each SES as we recognise the people living and working in each SES are best placed to prioritise the activities needed to build the resilience of the region’s critical ecosystem services (such as productive soils, clean air, high quality water). These local actions contribute to the success of Catchment-wide efforts to respond to issues such as fire, flood, drought and changes in land use.

Use the map below to view your Local Plan.

Agricultural FloodplainsProductive PlainsCommuting HillsUpland SlopesSouthern Forests

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Local Plan - Productive Plains
Local Plan - Commuting Hills
Local Plan - Southern Forests
Local Plan - Upland Slopes
Local Plan - Agricultural Floodplain

Table of Contents

Local Plan - Productive Plains

You can down load a PDF version here or view the Plan on the web pages below.

The Productive Plains 

The Productive Plains SES is located across the lower slopes and plains of the central Goulburn Broken Catchment and includes the towns of Nagambie, Euroa, Violet Town, Dookie and Tungamah.

The area’s  abundant food and water resources were first used by the Yorta Yorta and Taungurung Clans and the region’s many cultural sites  indicate its importance to Traditional Owners . Since European settlement, land-use change has included clearing for farming, gold rushes, the post-1930s farm mechanisation boom and the wool boom of the 1950s.

Agricultural land-use is highly valued in this area for the economic and social services it provides. There is also high value placed on the remaining native vegetation, on land and along waterways for the ecosystem and social services it contributes to. The future aspiration for the Productive Plains is to integrate productive capacity with ecological function and maintain social networks.

 

 

Working on Solid Foundations


Effort to sustain and restore the natural environment that underpins our way of life is by no means new. The area’s landholders have worked with a range of stakeholders to maintain and improve region’s land, water and biodiversity assets over the years. While acknowledging this effort there is also recognition building the region’s resilience to adapt to current and future drivers of change is an ongoing challenge.

The Challenges Ahead

The Challenge Ahead

Land use change is one of the major issues associated with this changing region, as farmers age and subdivide land that is now extremely valuable as lifestyle properties.

There are significant opportunities in many areas to:
• prevent the decline in native vegetation cover
• revegetate and connect remnant native vegetation patches. This landscape change also offers ecosystem services to increased farm production

Significant land-use changes are mostly in the south-western part of this area, in areas around Nagambie and across to the Strathbogie Ranges, where broad acre mixed farming properties are making way for more intensive enterprises such as thoroughbred horse studs. Such enterprises present significant challenges and opportunities for catchment management.


Although water policy reforms are considering the suite of ecosystem services provided by waterways, regulation of the waterways for multiple purposes, especially downstream supply, limits operation of the waterways in terms of water quality and ecological benefits.


Short-term agricultural production objectives and long-term native biodiversity objectives on the one piece of land are not always easy to align in this area: if climate variability and increased farm production drivers stimulate more intensive or different agricultural production systems, such as more cereal crops, biodiversity may be further threatened. These changes may also introduce new or increased threats to land and soil health, such as invasive pest species and soil acidity.


Fire risks in public land such as the Whroo Rushworth Forest are exacerbated when there are extended dry periods, which are part of climate variability, placing biodiversity habitat at risk.
Droughts stemming from climate variability highlight the need for research into new crops, or modification of existing crops, and their management.


Climate variability has resulted in extreme drought and floods over the last decade, impacting on this area long after the event, exacerbating the burden on rural communities.
 

Actions and Effort - Embed the resilience approach

*Progress rating is an indictaive qualitative assessment, these wil be further refined through data analysis, stakeholder and community consultation.

Strategic priority: Update and develop strategies

Responsibility

RCS Actions

Effort 

Progress*

Case Studies

Review and update existing strategic documents and sub-strategies and create new ones according to need. Monitor and record effectiveness of plan implementation (WS)  The Goulburn Broken CMA Biodiversity Strategy (finalised October 2016)

Strategic priority: Plan at social-ecological system scale

Responsibility

         

RCS Actions

Effort

Progress*

Case Studies

Develop an adaptive planning process for social-ecological systems to build and enhance their resilience Plan for disasters, education need that it may be a “When” not “if” scenario (WS) 

All municipalities have Municipal Emergency Management Plans, you can access these via the relevant web links. Strathbogie ShireBenalla Rural City and Mitchell Shire  not all shires have these plans on their websites.

DELWP is working with the Strathbogie Ranges community and agencies (including GB CMA) to develop a fire plan under the 'safer together' policy (pilot region).

Each municipaliy has a Municipal Emergency Resource Officer or Recovery Manager that is the main contact for emergencies in their shires.

Resources and monitoring is carried out under the AIIMS structure which directs people to services required.

Resourcing and monitoring needed 

Strategic priority: Provide adaptive management and leadership

Responsibiltiy

      

RCS Actions

Effort

Progress*

Case Studies

Build community and agency capacity to respond together to drivers of change Identify successful land management mentors and ask them to share knowledge (WS) 

An education day was run in conjunction with Taungurung Clans to increase school childrens knowledge of art, culture and music.

Yorta Yorta Nation Aboriginal Corporation has recorded stories of tradional uses of Country.

Research resilience knowledge gaps to inform decision making based on thresholds and tipping points Undertake adaptive management  Seven demonstration sites are been conducted as part of the SoilCare Program.
      Case studies are available on the GB CMA website
       

Actions and Effort - To Strengthen Partnerships

*Progress rating is an indictaive qualitative assessment, these wil be further refined through data analysis, stakeholder and community consultation.

Strategic priority: Reinfornce relationships between agencies and indusrty

Responsibility

RCS Actions

Effort 

Progress*

Case Studies

Define roles and relationships with regional delivery partners Strengthen input into land management decisions and provide support for community interface (WS)  Tacking Roadside Weeds - is a combine project with Strathbogie Shire Council, Granite Creek Landcare Group and Strathbogie Tablelands Landcare Group.

Strong relationship has been established between Whroo Goldfield Conservation Management Network and Mandalay Resources.

Yorta Yorta Nation Aboriningal Corporation have developed fact sheets that detail partnerships and leadership.

The Yorta Yorta Whole of Country Plan identifies partnerships and values important to the Yorta Yorta board.

The Taunurung Country Plan 2015-2025 identifies  the need for Memorandums of Understanding with local governments and agencies as a priority.

Strategic priority: Manage Public land collabratively

Responsibility

      

RCS Actions

Effort

Progress*

Case Studies

  Plan for disasters, education including percieved risks, that it may be a “When” not “if” scenario (WS) 
Resourcing and monitoring needed     
  Investigate the possibilty of Indigenous rangers been employed to mange crown land.   The Taunurung Country Plan 2015-2025 identifies the need for Indigenous rangers on public land.

Strategic priority: Provide adaptive management and leadership

Responsibiltiy

      

RCS Actions

Effort

Progress*

Case Studies

Build community and agency capacity to respond together to drivers of change

Identify successful land management mentors and ask them to share knowledge (WS) 

Investigate opportunities for economic independence, employment and entrepreneurship with the local Indigenous RAPs.

Gecko CLaN has funding for a  High School Sustainbable Agricultural Education project.

Yorta Yorta Whole of Country Plan and the Taunurung Country Plan identifies economic independence and entrepreneurship as important.

Taunurung Country Plan 2015-2025 identifies economic independence, reconcilliation and partnerships as important.

Case studies, project reports and demonstration site reports are available on the GB CMA website

Research resilience knowledge gaps to inform decision making based on thresholds and tipping points Undertake adaptive management   
       

Actions and Effort - Adapt to land-use change

*Progress rating is an indictaive qualitative assessment, these wil be further refined through data analysis, stakeholder and community consultation.

Strategic priority: Capture opportuntites from land development

Responsibility

      

RCS Actions

Effort 

Progress*

Case Studies

Deliver farm planning to integrate ecological and agricultural productivity benefits Review whole farm planning processes to ensure biodiversity and water is adequately addressed 
Whole Farm Planning is currently been reviewed and funding sort to run the program.
Environmental Best Management Practice courses   
 
Plan land-use to minimise loss of biodiversity Primarily in the Box-Ironbark Forest areas, possible interventions: alternative firewood plantations, large tree protection, encouragement of natural regeneration, ecological thinning of trees requires research,  manage the impact of native herbivores on private and public land, provision of permanent artificial hollows, reinstatement of understorey (including targeted seed collection programs). Also, seek historical data and monitoring results from the large natural reference area of Puckapunyal Whroo Goldfields Conservation Managment Network has a 1000 Hollows project and are actively creating corridors and new habitat.
Strategic land use planning for native vegetation off setting – Local Government over the counter native vegetation off setting program   
Manage wastewater treatment and stormwater runoff to minimise pollutants to urban waterways and wetlands Promote recycling of stormwater and runoff from roads into dams There is an education package availble for schools on the Goulburn Valley Water website
Work with local industries to reduce pollution including to stormwater  Great Shepparton Stormwater Management Plan supports urban designs and priorities
Promote land-use capability assessments and implementation, including use and management of water Manage water extraction sustainably   
Incorporate into the Victorian Planning provisions the requirement for land management plans to be provided as subdivision stage   
  Investigate the oppurtunities for Taunurung and Yorta Yorta to manage their own land for cultural practices, healing and camps A water plan for Yorta Yorta is currently been developed

Strategic priority: Plan for and manage floods

Responsibility

      

RCS Actions

Effort

Progress*

Case Studies

Provide floodplain decisions and advice in land-use planning Sustainable agriculture practice research and extension e.g. Gecko Clan’s Pasture Cropping and sustainable farming education and Strathbogie Tablelands Landcare Alternative Fertiliser Trials and acid tolerant pasture species. 

Gecko CLaN's Pasture Cropping project has created a great resource of information relating to sustainable agriculture.

Strathbogie Tablelands Landcare group have run a trial using alternative fertilizers.

GB CMA SoilCare program in conjunction with private landholders and groups are conducting seven demonstration sites.

Promote Whole Farm Planning program 
Understand more about the nature of flooding to manage its impact on the natural and built environments Promote the importance of flooding to the landscape including to urban people 

Signage of past flooding levels have been placed in Murchison and along the Goulburn River.

Yorta Yorta Country Plan identify improving water flows and wetland restoration as important to them.

Ensure communities are aware of flood levels in relation to their properties 

 

Actions and Effort - Adapt to water policy reform

*Progress rating is an indictaive qualitative assessment, these wil be further refined through data analysis, stakeholder and community consultation.

Strategic priority: Influence regional water policy

Responsibility

RCS Actions

Effort 

Progress*

Case Studies

Influence water policy development and implementation to secure water for improving natural asset condition and social and economic wellbeing   Development of groundwater local management plans Strathbogie 2013, Mid Goulburn 2014, Broken 2015 
 

The Yorta Yorta Whole of Country Plan identifies water as important and are currently developing a Water Plan.

Taunurung Country Plan 2015-2025 identifies water as an important cultural and economic right.

Create opportunities for community leaders to contribute to water policy Allow local input into regional implementation of overarching water policy 
 
       

Strategic priority: Deliver water to waterways and wetlands

Responsibility

   

RCS Actions

Effort

Progress*

Case Studies

Plan, deliver and monitor environmental water delivery to improve the condition of priority waterways and wetlands Refer to the Regional Water Strategy for details

Environmental water was put into Doctors Swamp in 2015.

The Goulburn River have had flushes to promote river bank growth, invertebrate breeding and fish breeding.

Identify and manage key areas likely to provide refuge in the face of climate change, including the prioritisation of wetlands for environmental watering. 
Restore environmental flows to Holyland Plains and Caniambo Swamp   
  Promote the importance of flooding to the landscape including to urban people 

Past flooding signage has been placed along the Goulburn River.

As part of the local council planning approval process flooding is identfied when appropriate.

Ensure communities are aware of flood levels in relation to their properties 
Prioritise protection of waterway and wetlands within the modernised irrigation delivery system Work with Trust for Nature to protect key wetlands and/or use easements to allow for over bank flows   
     

Strategic priority: Use water efficiently on farms

Responsibility

      

RCS Actions

Effort

Progress*

Case Studies

Modernise water delivery on irrigated land to provide ecological and productivity benefits Adaptive shallow groundwater management occurring in the Agricultural Floodplains SES. Tools developed could be applied or adapted to Productive Plains  The GB CMA Farm Water Program have been investing in improved water mangment across the catchment through a Commonwealth Funded project.
Promote collection and reuse opportunities within agriculture industries e.g. capture water from large roofed areas and roadsides into dams
       

Actions and Effort - Adapt to climate variability

*Progress rating is an indictaive qualitative assessment, these wil be further refined through data analysis, stakeholder and community consultation.

Strategic priority: Adapt to climate variability risk

Responsibility

      

RCS Actions

Effort 

Progress*

Case Studies

Factor risk of climate variability and identify adaptation strategies in Goulburn Broken CMA and partner plans Sustainable Agriculture Practices such as Gecko Clan’s Soil Carbon activities. Education of landholders to adapt to climate variability 

VROT Action Statements

Gecko CLaN, Longwood Plains Conservation Mangment Network and the GB CMA SoilCare program are activiely engaging with the community on sustainable agriculture practices.

The Yorta Yorta Whole of Country Plan identifies climate change as an oppurtunity for invovlement.

Target permanent protection of large habitat patches Longwood Plains and Whroo Goldfields Conservation Mangment Networks and the GB CMA Woodlands Project are all projects that are protecting habitats.
Improve habitat connection between hills and plains including use of waterways like the Mount Piper to Monument Hill Biolink

Whroo Goldfields Conservation Management Network has created vegetation corridors with its Woodland Birds Project and Yellow  Gums and Goldfields Project. 

The Glenaroua Land Management groups are creating the Piper Biolink is creating a linkage to Monument Hill

Encourage habitat protection along drainage lines and wetlands 
Build resilience of remnant habitat to absorb climate variability. Need to research thresholds in this areas 
Create opportunities for community leaders to contribute to water policy Partner agencies involvement in fire management strategy development 
The Yorta Yorta Whole of Country Plan identifies traditional fire practices as a tool for modern fire management.
Identify and maintain well-functioning ecosystems and develop strategies for ecosystems to adapt, and transform if necessary 

The Yorta Yorta Whole of Country Plan identify management of flora and fauna as important. 

Taunurung Country Plan 2015-2025 identifies the need to be invovled with climate change action.

 

Strategic priority: Respond and recover from climatic events

Responsibility

   

RCS Actions

Effort

Progress*

Case Studies

Plan and implement flood, fire and drought response and recovery Delivery of support to affected communities (RCS)
Ensure proactive rather than reactive approach 

Gecko Clan Fire Recovery Program

Mooroopna and Shepparton have a local flood guide

Victorian State Emergency Services have flooding impact and guides for Benalla (including Baddaginnnie), SeymourStrathbogie Shire (including Avenel and Longwood) and North East Region Flood Response Plan refers to Glenrowan flooding

Reduce the impact of flooding on Urban Centres including Benalla, Seymour, Avenel, Longwood, Glenrowan and Baddaginnie  
Integrate biodiversity enhancement planning with community fire safety planning   
Work with Emergency Management Victoria to reduce recovery response times following natural disasters  All municipalities have Municipal Emergency Management Plans you can access these via the relevant web links. Campaspe ShireStrathbogie Shire, Moira Shire, Benalla Rural City and Mitchell Shire not all shires have these plans on their websites.

Strategic priority: Capture opportunities from a low carbon future

Responsibility

   

RCS Actions

Effort

Progress*

Case Studies

Identify where carbon sequestration activities provide environmental, economic and social benefits Support landholders wanting to enter the carbon market   
Establish private/public partnerships to develop a low carbon restoration fund (WS) Trust for Nature to prepare a proposal
       

Action and Effort - Adapt to increase farm production

*Progress rating is an indictaive qualitative assessment, these wil be further refined through data analysis, stakeholder and community consultation.

Strategic priority: Manage risk to agricultural production

Responsibility

      

RCS Actions

Effort 

Progress*

Case Studies

Deliver surface and sub-surface drainage works across a modernised irrigation delivery system, including adaptive shallow groundwater management Create awareness of good practise e.g. forums/field days 

Gecko CLaN are informing landholders at a number of events identifying good practice activities.

The GB CMA website has case studies, demonstration reports and forum presenations

Support farm planning to consider climate variability and risk management  
The SoilCare program in conjunction with Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport and Resources staff are running Spring Stocktake workshops that assist farmers to measure their water holding capacity of thier dams. Gecko CLaN and other community orgnaisaitons are running similar events.
Dryland producers need to improve water security in the face of climate change
 

Strategic priority: Establish sustainable agricultural practices

Responsibility

      

RCS Actions

Effort

Progress*

Case Studies

Create awareness and acceptance of sustainable management practices to improve land and soil condition Promote and showcase land management methods and philosophies that demonstrate a whole-of-farm approach, where both biodiversity and production benefits can be realised 

Gecko CLaN is practising mosaic burning with Yorta Yorta 

The GB CMA website has case studies, demonstration reports and forum presenations

The Seymour Secondary College have built an Indigenous garden showcasing Indigenous plants and art.

Identify the best methods including education campaigns, of addressing the threats (e.g. cultivation, over grazing and inappropriate grazing regimes and cropping) to natural assets E.G. soil, water quality and pastures
Promote practises to maintain and improve ground cover at all times 

Gecko CLaN Pasture Cropping promotes ground cover and multi species planting.

The Goulburn Broken CMA SoilCare program promotes 100% ground cover all year round. 

Facilitate forums on how to make agricultural land more sustainable and how to identify suitable practises taking advantage of new research The GB CMA SoilCare Program have run a series of forums highlighting the importance of organic matter in the soil, Composting and high level speakers promote whole of farm practices.

Strategic priority: Increace biodiversity in agricultural landuse

Responsibility

   

RCS Actions

Effort

Progress*

Case Studies

Create awareness and acceptance of land management practices that protect and improve terrestrial and aquatic habitat Provide education opportunities through groups such as Landcare and Conservation Management Networks 

The Pasture Cropping project has been a great success for the Gecko CLaN.

Gecko CLaN has an Indian Myna project in the Benalla region.

The Goulburn Broken revegeation guide is available on the GB CMA website.

Engagement with farming groups on benefits of changed management practice E.G.. Gecko Clan’s Pasture Cropping project - farmers teaching farmers 
Work with landholders to manage Noisy Miners and Indian Myna's in patches of remnants. This should include information on how best to and assistance with approvals 
Update the Goulburn Broken Revegetation guide 
Identify environmental stewardship opportunities for land managers Accelerate and expand stewardship programs that target large-scale landscape restoration E.G. protection of remnant vegetations, erosion control and pest plants and animals

Support projects like the Grey-crowned Babbler and Regent Honeyeater projects 

Glenaroua Land Managment group are developing a biolink between Mount Piper and Monument Hill

Establish or improve statutory measurements for environmental protection standards e.g. EU model   
Work with landholders to protect and improve biodiversity on private land and build understanding of its contribution to sustainable and profitable farming Implement a biodiversity incentives project that protects and enhances habitat (Regional Catchment Strategy) with follow up visits  Woodland Tender project has a goal of 1500Ha on private land .
  Improve riparian vegetation and in stream habitat condition   
  Better promote the win/win of improved production and biodiversity  The GB CMA SoilCare Program promotes soil management + better patures = equals stock for selling.

Action and Effort - Additional Actions and Ideas

• Undertake projects to manage species such as Blackberry Indian Myna, Rabbits, Prickly Pear, Indian Fig (L&B Team engagement)


• Community concerns exists over increasing number of dams in this area and potential for salinity to return (L&B Team engagement


• Community keen to see government take action on landholders undertaking poor land management practise particularly where they impact on others (L&B Team engagement)


• European Carp Control (GB RWS 2014)

Get Involved

Local Plan - Agricultural Floodplain

The Shepparton Irrigation Land and Water Management Plan 2016-2020 provides the basis for the Agricultural Floodplain Local Plan.  The Land and Water Management Plan will be released in early 2016.

This Shepparton Irrigation Region Land and Water Management Plan (SIRLWMP) is the fourth update of the adaptive 30-year plan first prepared in 1989 (GBSPPAC 1989). It lists priority interventions for the next five years to shore up the natural base of soils, water and biodiversity. So far, Governments have invested $450 million in implementing the plan. The investment by the local community is more than double this amount (GBCMA 2011). 

The focus on managing the natural base evolved from an emphasis on the single threat of salinity in the 1980s to integrated catchment management in the mid-1990s, to valuing total benefits via ‘ecosystem services’ (such as maintaining productive soils and clean water) in the early 2000s, to the resilience of complex systems of people and nature from 2005.

Plan implementation results directly in works on-the-ground and increases regional resilience by connecting stakeholders: the plan and its resulting processes influence how stakeholders invest, impacting positively on natural resources.


Building on three decades of lessons and achievements, this version of the plan identifies the next phase of critical actions by bringing into sharp focus the features of the region and its people that make it a stand-out in terms of natural and other competitive advantages.
While the community-agency partnership model fostered during development and implementation of the 1989 plan remains a feature today, this update also highlights the importance of linking long-term management of natural resources more directly with the business of food production.

While the community-agency partnership model fostered during development and implementation of the 1989 plan remains a feature today, this update also highlights the importance of linking long-term management of natural resources more directly with the business of food production.
This update also lays down a clearer pathway between the complex system of people and nature and what needs to be done to make the regional system resilient. The plan identifies five critical attributes that underpin the functioning of the SIR as a system and therefore need to be targeted for action to improve or maintain. Eight priorities have been identified to guide actions in meeting goals for these critical attributes.

The Shepparton Irrigation Region People and Planning Integration Committee (SIRPPIC), which includes community and agency stakeholders, plays a key role in setting direction, monitoring implementation of this plan and adapting it to changed circumstances, on behalf of the Goulburn Broken Catchment Management Authority Board (GBCMA).
 

Figure 1. Planning hierarchy showing how goals are achieved by implementing priorities


This is the last update of the original 30-year plan: consistent with the ‘resilience approach’, the plan is dynamic and will undergo a major review in 2020.
The SIRLWMP is one of several ‘sub-strategies’ that guide implementation of the overarching and adaptive Goulburn Broken Region Catchment Strategy (GBCMA 2013). The SIRLWMP also satisfies Victorian Government land and water management plan guidelines for irrigation areas (DSE 2008).

Local Plan - Commuting Hills

You can download a PDF version here or view the Plan on the web pages below.

The Commuting Hills features the mountainous urban fringe of the southern and south-western Goulburn Broken Catchment. Large tracts of public land and small privately owned forested land remain over much of this area. Towns include Kilmore, Broadford, Kinglake and Marysville.

Traditional Owners shaped the land of the Commuting Hills. Since then, the Commuting Hills has been cleared for agriculture and gold rushes and rail and road infrastructure. A large number of residents in this area commute to workplaces outside of the catchment i.e. Melbourne.
Ecologically this area is highly valued for the extent and connectivity of remaining unique forests and the rich diversity of species. Forests are also highly valued for the lifestyle they offer to people who live here, as well as the economic value created through agriculture, forestry and recreation.
This area is of significant cultural value, with many Aboriginal sites remaining in these largely undisturbed landscapes. Waterways are highly valued for their pristine condition and the important service they provide; fresh clean water throughout the Catchment. Communities here are diverse, vibrant and energetic. The future aspiration for the Commuting Hills is an area that safely enhances its natural appeal and value for those living, farming, working and visiting.

Working on Solid Foundations

Effort to sustain and restore the natural environment that underpins our way of life is by no means new. The area’s landholders have worked with a range of stakeholders to maintain and improve region’s land, water and biodiversity assets over the years. While acknowledging this effort there is also recognition building the region’s resilience to adapt to current and future drivers of change is an ongoing challenge.

The Challenge Ahead

Although the Commuting Hills has large areas of native vegetation, land-use changes on private and public land (described above) need to be managed and monitored. Native vegetation ecosystem services (and threshold parameters to be managed) include:
•  biodiversity habitat (quality, patch sizes and corridor widths)
•  clean water (riparian buffer widths)
•  natural amenity (patterns of native vegetation).

Extreme climate variability has resulted in drought, fires and floods over the last decade, impacting on this area long after the event. This is exacerbating the impacts of land-use change and is placing an additional burden on rural communities, several of which have been stretched to breaking point.

Increased frequency of bushfires and drought, resulting from extreme climate variability, and planned fires are significant additional threats to aquatic biodiversity habitat and water quality (through increased soil erosion) and to terrestrial biodiversity habitat (loss of structural diversity).

The spread of urban populations and the resulting development also need to be considered in the context of bushfires and floods so that economic and social values are not significantly impacted.

Actions and Effort - Embed the resilience approach

 *Progress rating is an indictaive qualitative assessment, these wil be further refined through data analysis, stakeholder and community consultation.

Strategic priority: Update and develop strategies

Responsibility

RCS Actions

Effort 

Progress*

Case Studies

Review and update existing strategic documents and sub-strategies and create new ones according to need. Monitor and record effectiveness of plan implementation (WS)  Continue to implement and update stormwater management plans

Strategic priority: Plan at social-ecological system scale

Responsibility

      

RCS Actions

Effort

Progress*

Case Studies

Develop an adaptive planning process for social-ecological systems to build and enhance their resilience  Develop links with Local Government “Health and Wellbeing Plans” (WS)  
 

Strategic priority: Provide adaptive management and leadership

Responsibiltiy

        

RCS Actions

Effort

Progress*

Case Studies

Build community and agency capacity to respond together to drivers of change

Strong emphasis needed on community capacity building (WS) South West Goulburn Landcare Network have been running the Farm Blitz Program with annual funding since 2011. Events are regularly coordinated to share knowledge, involve people and build social networks.
Maximise value of voluntary groups (WS)
Ensure regular contact to understand progress and understand who leads what (WS)
 
Research resilience knowledge gaps to inform decision making based on thresholds and tipping points Describe what resilience is and start measuring it (WS) (GB CMA and others)  
       
       

Actions and Effort - To Strengthen Partnerships

*Progress rating is an indictaive qualitative assessment, these wil be further refined through data analysis, stakeholder and community consultation.

Strategic priority: Reinfornce relationships between agencies and indusrty

Responsibility

RCS Actions

Effort 

Progress*

Case Studies

Define roles and reslationships with regional delivery partnersInvestigate and take opportunities to collaborate with industry (WS) Involvement in Goulburn Valley-Water's Ecological Risk Assessment into upgrade of waste water treatment for the growing populations of Mansfield and Kilmore, provides opportunity to define mutually beneficial outcomes. 
Need to collectively look for opportunities to fund priority projects (WS)
Need to improve information sharing e.g. environmental assets. This will assist in evaluating progress (WS)
Identify overlapping and complimentary strategies and work on improving connections (WS)
  

Strategic priority: Manage Public land collabratively

Responsibility

      

RCS Actions

Effort

Progress*

Case Studies

Undertake works on public land and Crown land frontages to improve waterways and wetlands Mange all remnant vegetation collaboratively e.g. CMN (WS)

Landholders, Strath Creek Landcare Group and various government agencies (GBCMA, DELWP, DEDTJR, Local Council, VicRoads) have collaborated to address blackberry infestations along the King Parrot Creek to optimise results with greatest efficiency.

King Parrot Creek Project Clip

Including the public/private interface. There are various examples. (WS) (Public land and frontage managers)

Strategic priority: Adopt flexible engagement approaches

Responsibiltiy

      

RCS Actions

Effort

Progress*

Case Studies

Build capacity in existing and new conservation groups to deliver catchment management projectsTailor education to the ever changing types of land managers. Approaches that have worked well include field days covering various topics (WS)Farm Blitz program facilitates training opportunities for skill sets determined to be in need and/or of interest to participants. Regular workshops coordinated.
   
   Mitchell Shire - New Rural Landholder Kit Evaluation
    

Actions and Effort - Adapt to land-use change

*Progress rating is an indictaive qualitative assessment, these wil be further refined through data analysis, stakeholder and community consultation.

Strategic priority: Capture opportuntites from land development

Responsibility

      

RCS Actions

Effort 

Progress*

Case Studies

Plan land-use to minimise loss of biodiversity Work with Murrindindi and Mitchell Councils to identify high value habitat assets and connectivity pathways to inform planning (RCS) (CMA/DEPI)
This is supported by Biodiversity Action 1 of the Mitchell Shire Environment Strategy (2014)
Assist local government to develop and apply appropriate planning tools for all council plans and strategies (e.g. Municipal Strategic Statement review, policies, & overlays) to increase the protection and reduce risks to biodiversity (e.g., matching land use intensity to land characteristics) (BS 2010) (WS) (CMA/DEPI) GB CMA participation in Murrindindi Environmental Advisory Committee to share information, discuss and provide comment to local council around natural resource management.
Undertake “rural area strategies” to detail planning controls that will provide direction for appropriate use and development of rural areas (WS) (Local Government) This is supported by Rural land use and management action 5 of the Mitchell Shire Environment Strategy (2015)
Plan land-use to minimise loss of biodiversity Primarily in the Box-Ironbark Forest areas, possible interventions: alternative firewood plantations, large tree protection, encouragement of natural regeneration, ecological thinning, native herbivore management, provision of permanent artificial hollows, reinstatement of understorey (including targeted seed collection programs). Also, seek historical data and monitoring results from the large natural reference area of Puckapunyal
Strategic Land use planning for native vegetation off setting – Local Government over the counter Native Vegetation off setting program   
Manage wastewater treatment and stormwater runoff to minimise pollutants to urban waterways and wetlands Continue to implement, review and evaluate urban Stormwater Management plan and programs. Continue to implement and improve water sensitive urban design (WS)
   
Manage public land to minimise loss of biodiversity Work with all land managers, including Parks Victoria, DEPI, local government and private landholders adjacent to public land to better manage the Puckapunyal public/private land interface (modified RCS)  
   
Promote broader community awareness and acceptance of practices to protect and improve the condition of natural assets Promote land management practises that protect water quality and yield (RWS) Mitchell Shire Council Land Management Policy addresses land degradation problems; pest plants and animals, salinity, erosion, and loss of native flora and fauna. Eligible landholders receive rate reductions for land management practices that arrests land degradation that has off-site and downstream effects (RCS)
  Pest Plant and Animal Control e.g. including  Gorse & Carp (CNRMAP 2013)  

Promoted awareness and involvement in carp management at the Hughes Creek Fish Circus in Avenel this year.

Hughes Creek Fish Circus Clip 

Promote land-use capability assessments and implementation, including use and management of water Promote Whole Farm Planning program (RCS)  

Mitchell Shire Council distributes information on biodiversity, native vegetation, weeds and sustainability through the Rural
Landholders Kit and New Residents Kit. The
Kit is sent to all new landholders >2ha (RCS)

Support and promote projects that work with landholders to achieve greater awareness and uptake of best practise e.g. Equine Landcare (CNRMAP 2013)

Strategic priority: Plan for and manage floods

Responsibility

      

RCS Actions

Effort

Progress*

Case Studies

Understand more about the nature of flooding to manage its impact on the natural and built environments Learn from historic events and respect local knowledge (WS)

GB CMA undertake flood studies across the catchment to help inform decisions and identify risk. A study was recently completed for Flowerdale, while investigations are presently underway for Buxton and Kilmore townships.

King Parrot Creek Design Flow Estimates Report

 

 

Actions and Effort - Adapt to water policy reform

*Progress rating is an indictaive qualitative assessment, these wil be further refined through data analysis, stakeholder and community consultation.

Strategic priority: Influence regional water policy

Responsibility

RCS Actions

Effort 

Progress*

Case Studies

Influence water policy development and implementation to secure water for improving natural asset condition and social and economic wellbeing Encourage wider use of groundwater and close down surface water catchments where appropriate (WS)   
 
Upper Goulburn groundwater management plan shall manage the issue or trade of entitlement (WS) Consult with local representatives and other agencies to define priorities and determine how best to reach target audience. Use opportunities to cross promote programs and undertake complimentary works.
Create opportunities for community leaders to contribute to water policy Expand and develop partnerships with Landcare and corporate groups to assist in delivery of fencing and revegetation programs along riparian zones on stream of significance (WS) (Government/Landcare)
Mind shift needed at DEPI to vary riparian land use along stream of significance (WS) (DEPI) Continue to support and promote riparian protection. Share information as it becomes available through various networks, such as Farmers Like Trees
Promote that riparian improvements mean increase in property value (WS) (Government and others)
Look for opportunities when the new Victorian Water Act is enacted (WS)
       

Strategic priority: Deliver water to waterways and wetlands

Responsibility

   

RCS Actions

Effort

Progress*

Case Studies

Plan, deliver and monitor environmental water delivery to improve the condition of priority waterways and wetlands Continue to improve the other elements of waterways and wetlands (WS) Goulburn River investigations have been undertaken to guide decisions on flows required to achieve different outcomes.
   
     

Strategic priority: Use water efficiently on farms

Responsibility

      

RCS Actions

Effort

Progress*

Case Studies

Modernise water delivery on irrigated land to provide ecological and productivity benefits Work with dryland agriculture to secure/develop water resources to maintain/increase agricultural production (WS)  
Educate about the cost/use of farm dams e.g. evaporation (WS)
       

Action and Effort - Adapt to increase farm production

*Progress rating is an indictaive qualitative assessment, these wil be further refined through data analysis, stakeholder and community consultation.

Strategic priority: Establish sustainable agricultural practices

Responsibility

      

RCS Actions

Effort 

Progress*

Case Studies

Create awareness and acceptance of sustainable management practices to improve land and soil condition Work with land managers to promote sustainable farming practises including soil health practises (L&B Team engagement) Support agri-business, currently happening but more needed (WS)
Continue to adjust whole farm planning to suit changing landholder needs (WS) Deliver whole farm planning (WS)
Continue to focus on remediating historic and emerging soil erosion issues to maintain the resilience of the natural environment and agricultural values (WS)
Ensure biodiversity protection is a key component of whole farm planning(WS)
 

 

Strategic priority: Increase biodiversity in agricultural land-use

Responsibility

      

RCS Actions

Effort 

Progress*

Case Studies

Create awareness and acceptance of land management practices that protect and improve terrestrial and aquatic habitat Continue to support and work with Landcare to revegetate strategic linkages particularly along waterways (WS)  
Improve crown water frontage management for community benefit (WS) (DEPI)  
Promoted incentives to improve natural resource mangement on private property to Shires and at events.
Provide incentives for landholder stewardship (active management for conservation) (BS 2010) (Government and others
 

vironmental stewardhip opporuntities for land managers

Promote concept of farm dams as wetlands (WS)  

Permanently protect areas on private land ensuring protection is upheld e.g. TFN covenants (WS)

.

 

Actions and Effort - Adapt to climate variability

*Progress rating is an indictaive qualitative assessment, these wil be further refined through data analysis, stakeholder and community consultation.

Strategic priority: Adapt to climate variability risk

Responsibility

      

RCS Actions

Effort 

Progress*

Case Studies

Factor risk of climate variability and identify adaptation strategies in Goulburn Broken CMA and partner plans Implement bio links e.g. Piper (WS)  
 Identify areas of drought refugia, and work with research institutions to better understand the influence of fire regimes on various biota (RCS) (CMA/DEPI)  
Recognise the vulnerability of Dryland agriculture(WS)  
Permanently protect remnant vegetation (WS)
Consider biodiverse carbon plantings (WS)
Find ways to support on farm energy efficiency and generation (WS)
Assist with and support the implementation and revision of the Goulburn Broken Greenhouse Alliance (GBGA) Climate Change Adaptation Plan in conjunction with the GBGA.
Factor risks to natural assets into public land fire management plans Input into a strategic approach to planned burning that considers ecological values(RCS) (DEPI)
 
   

Strategic priority: Respond and recover from climatic events

Responsibility

   

RCS Actions

Effort

Progress*

Case Studies

Plan and implement flood, fire and drought response and recovery Input into a strategic approach to planned burning that considers ecological values(RCS) (DEPI)

Contribute to the Hume Regional Emergency Management Committee (RCS)

Gecko CLaN were actively involved with fire recovery in the 2015 in the Creightons Creek, Lake Rowan and Stewarton region.

Ensure information about high priority biodiversity assets is considered by fire-fighting authorities prior to and during wildfires. (BS 2010) (DEPI)
Support and facilitate collaboration between NRM industry and the CFA so that biodiversity and fire are not seen as conflicting e.g. use community fire guard model (WS)
Draw on local resources for prompt response to disasters (WS)
Factor community morale building into recovery (WS) Seymour flood mitigation project underway (WS)
Build community resilience through increasing community awareness and knowledge to live with and plan for climatic events (WS)  

Strategic priority: Capture opportunities from a low carbon future

Responsibility

   

RCS Actions

Effort

Progress*

Case Studies

Identify where carbon sequestration activities provide environmental, economic and social benefits Develop East-West linkages for migration (biodiversity) under climate change (Priority zones background paper to BS 2010)  
Work collaboratively to best implement vegetation offsets (WS)
       

Action and Effort - Additional Actions and Ideas

• Use biodiversity information and knowledge to identify spatial priorities at the  landscape-scale (e.g. existing and proposed biolinks) (BS 2010)


• Develop a NEW ecologically based land development program. As this area is close to Melbourne and the airport there appears to be a need for properties with high environmental value, or the potential to have high environmental values for people to own, enjoy and improve. TFN has some experience here (WS)

Local Plan - Southern Forests

You can download a PDF version here or veiw the Plan on the web pages below

The Southern Forests SES to the south-east of the Goulburn Broken Catchment includes seasonally snow-covered alps, moist montane and sclerophyll forests. Towns in the Southern Forests include Marysville, Jamieson and Woods Point.

The Southern Forests predominately occur on public land that is managed as state forest, alpine resorts and national or state parks by Parks Victoria, Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport and Resources (DEDJTR), the Alpine Resorts Co-ordinating Council and Alpine Resort Management Boards. The Southern Forests area is the largest intact native vegetation areas in the Catchment.

The forest landscapes are highly valued for their ecological extent and diversity, cultural significance and economic importance generated through recreation and tourism, and plantation and native forest timber harvesting.

The ecosystem services provided by the Southern Forests include high quality and reliable water that provides environmental, economic and social values across and beyond the Catchment.

The future aspiration for the Southern Forests is a managed ecosystem that balances ecological, economic and recreational needs.

The challenge ahead

Although the natural environment is relatively intact in the Southern Forests, threats from current land uses and possible land-use changes could compound the legacy of major natural events (fire, drought) and historic land-uses.
Increased frequency of unplanned bushfires and drought, resulting from extreme climate variability, and planned fires are significant additional threats to aquatic biodiversity habitat and water quality (through increased soil erosion) and to terrestrial biodiversity habitat (through loss of structural diversity).

This is particularly important at the public/private land interface.

Although the natural environment is relatively intact in the Southern Forests, threats from current land uses and possible land-use changes could compound the legacy of major natural events (fire, drought) and historic land-uses.

Increased frequency of unplanned bushfires and drought, resulting from extreme climate variability, and planned fires are significant additional threats to aquatic biodiversity habitat and water quality (through increased soil erosion) and to terrestrial biodiversity habitat (through loss of structural diversity).

This is particularly important at the public/private land interface.

Actions and Effort: To embed the resilience approach

*Progress rating is an indictaive qualitative assessment, these wil be further refined through data analysis, stakeholder and community consultation.

Strategic priority: Update and develop strategies

Responsibility

RCS Actions

Effort 

Progress*

Case Studies

Review and update existing strategic documents and sub-strategies and create new ones according to need.    G-MW to develop groundwater management plan across all surface water catchments that drain into Lake Eildon

Strategic priority: Plan at social-ecological system scale

Responsibility

     

RCS Actions

Effort

Progress*

Case Studies

Develop an adaptive planning process for social-ecological systems to build and enhance their resilience  Coordinate various levels of planning between agencies, NGO’s and Local government (WS)   
Empower public to do what they can locally and ensure these efforts are recognised as contributing to wider scale benefits (WS )
  What is the state of the environment? How are we measuring to manage? Then how are we managing ? (WS)    
  Encourage all land managers to identify their ultimate objective then link this to practical management and start taking required steps (WS )    

Strategic priority: Provide adaptive management and leadership

Responsibiltiy

        

RCS Actions

Effort

Progress*

Case Studies

Build community and agency capacity to respond together to drivers of change

Encourage thinking outside the box and be prepared to support new initiatives  (WS)  
 
 
 
     
       
       

Actions and Effort: To strengthen partnerships

*Progress rating is an indictaive qualitative assessment, these wil be further refined through data analysis, stakeholder and community consultation.

Strategic priority: Reinfornce relationships between agencies and indusrty

Responsibility

RCS Actions

Effort 

Progress*

Case Studies

Define roles and reslationships with regional delivery partners Build relationships and collaborative opportunities with land managers and industry (WS )  
Work with Vic Forests and local community to identify bioenergy opportunities (GV Community Energy) (WS)
Develop meaningful ways to describe successful relationships and track their status (WS )
Explore the role of private enterprise in NRM  (WS)
   

Strategic priority: Manage Public land collabratively

Responsibility

      

RCS Actions

Effort

Progress*

Case Studies

Undertake works on public land and Crown land frontages to improve waterways and wetlands  Manage erosion and sedimentation from the likes of tracks on public land (RWS 2014)  
Support more collective/collaborative environemental works on waterways and riparian areas (WS)
  Facilitate forums to discuss and promote collaboration and to publicise successes (WS )    
Collaborate with Traditional Owners in catchment management Recognise multicultural diversity within the catchment and be aware of this in delivery of information (WS)    
       

Actions and Effort: To adapt to land-use change

*Progress rating is an indictaive qualitative assessment, these wil be further refined through data analysis, stakeholder and community consultation.

Strategic priority: Capture opportuntites from land development

Responsibility

      

RCS Actions

Effort 

Progress*

Case Studies

Deliver farm planning to integrate ecological and agricultural productivity benefits Educate tree changers on land management practices (WS)    
Plan land-use to minimise loss of biodiversity Assist local government to develop and apply appropriate planning tools for all council plans and strategies (e.g. Municipal Strategic Statement review, policies, & overlays) to increase the protection and reduce risks to biodiversity (e.g., matching land use intensity to land characteristics). (BS 2010)
                                
The Mansfield Shire Environment Advisory Committee’s primary function is to advise Council on matters pertaining to:
• The Mansfield Shire Environment Priority Action Plan implementation and annual review
• Planning initiatives
• Environmental program and policy priorities
• Opportunities to participate in State or Federal Government environment initiatives, programs and grants
• The development of mechanisms to advertise and promote Council's environmental management
• and sustainable development policies, strategies and projects
• The development of educational mediums to raise the awareness of environmental issues and management
• Support and mentor Council’s environment staff, and
• Providing a conduit between Council and Community in environmental maters
 
 
Manage public land to minimise loss of biodiversity Possible interventions: Converting  forests to parks managed for conservation, PPA control (inc deer management), people/recreation management, review codes of practice, better understanding impacts of major fire events, work with Alpine resorts to prevent/reduce vegetation loss and disturbances, preparation of fire ecology plans/fire management plans, crown frontage licencing for conservation. (Priority zones Background Paper to BS 2010)
The Holly removal project in the RCS case study demonstrates a management project at the public- private interface (RCS)
Promote broader community awareness and acceptance of practices to protect and improve the condition of natural assets Local Government needs access to information on high value assets to inturn promote values in their area (WS)  
Promote land-use capability assessments and implementation, including use and management of water Land capability assessments are “mandatory” in the Southern Forests as directed by the EPA code of practice for onsite domestic wastewater (WS)  
 

Strategic priority: Plan for and manage floods

Responsibility

        

RCS Actions

Effort

Progress*

Case Studies

Understand more about the nature of flooding to manage its impact on the natural and built environments Learn from historic events and respect local knowledge (WS)
Updated Flood Overlay for Mansifield.
 

 

Actions and Effort: To adapt to water policy reform

*Progress rating is an indictaive qualitative assessment, these wil be further refined through data analysis, stakeholder and community consultation.

Strategic priority: Use water efficiently on farms

Responsibility: 

      

RCS Actions

Effort 

Progress*

Case Studies

Modernise water delivery on irrigated land to provide ecological and productivity benefits Works with dryland agriculture to secure/develop water resources to maintain/increase agricultural production  
 
   
       
 

Actions and Effort: To adapt to climate variability

*Progress rating is an indictaive qualitative assessment, these wil be further refined through data analysis, stakeholder and community consultation.

Strategic priority: Adapt to climate variability risk

Responsibility

      

RCS Actions

Effort 

Progress*

Case Studies

Factor risk of climate variability and identify adaptation strategies in Goulburn Broken CMA and partner plans Identify areasvulnerable to  drought and fire (and climate) refugia and manage for protection (RCS)  
 Undertake risk assessments for specific biodiversity assets (including threatened species) to determine priority for investment and disinvestment. (BS 2010)  
Distinguish between short and long term fluctuations and long term trends and educate on the consequences of these e.g. scenario planning (WS) The Goulburn Broken Climate Change Adaptation Plan - in developement
 
 
 
A range of agencies to be included in discussions by DEPI and PV to have input into land management decisions (RCS
Factor risks to natural assets into public land fire management plans
 
Ensure information about high priority biodiversity assets is considered by fire-fighting authorities prior to and during wildfires (BS 2010)  

Strategic priority: Respond and recover from climatic events

Responsibility

   

RCS Actions

Effort

Progress*

Case Studies

Plan and implement flood, fire and drought response and recovery Identify risks to drought refuge areas and develop mitigation plans (RCS)

Flood Investigation in the Marysville and Buxton area underway

Reduce the impact of flooding on Urban Centres including Marysville, Buxton, Woods Point and residents along the Delatite River. (IFS 2014)
Manage and design for episodic disturbances
 
 
 
 

Local Plan - Upland Slopes

You can download a PDF version here or view the Plan on the web pages below

Introduction

The Upland Slopes forms part of Taungurung Country. The Taungurung Clans were the first people of the rivers, valleys and mountains in this region. Before European settlement, the hills were covered in forests and open grassy woodlands dominated the valleys.  The Taungurung Country Plan 2016, asserts Taungurung inherent rights as Traditional Owners of Country, and continue to be captured in Aboriginal Law despite the dispossession and dispersal of Taungurung people, who remain resilient and proud. Relevant NRM 'key concerns' documented in the Plan are: being engaged in a timely and respectful manner in decision making about activities on Country - from the beginning of decision making discussions - with regard to all aspects of Country; engaging in all aspects of Country including beneath the ground to the tops of our mountains and trees and the length of our waterways and all within them; building the capacity of our people to take an active role in decision making including natural and cultural resource management; protecting and further building traditional knowledge of land, waterways, food, flora and fauna and medicines; and ensuring the plan is used to guide and promote investment and awareness.

The Upland Slopes landscapes and ecosystems are now very different to how they were managed under Taungurung Law.  More recently, much of this area has been dominated by agricultural land, forestry and lifestyle properties, which is reflected in subdivisions of farming land into smaller blocks.
The many waterways yield a good quality and quantity of water, which provides economic (agriculture and tourism), ecological, and social (lifestyle and and recreational (boating, fishing)) services. The remaining native vegetation is valued for the ecosystem services it provides as well as economic (tourism, forestry) and social (aesthetics, lifestyle) values it provides. Agricultural production is valued, and lifestyle opportunities of this area are increasingly appreciated by full-time and occasional residents.
The future aspiration for the Upland Slopes is an area of inspired and diverse community participating widely in sustainable agriculture and lifestyle land-use, for conservation, production and tourism outcomes.

Climate Change is one of the biggest threats to land, water and biodiversity, and is likely to have a multiplier effect on existing threats.  However, the future is uncertain and this creates complexity in how best to plan for change to ensure that social-ecological systems continue to function in a desirable way.  To further develop this plan, and consider climate change in planning for the future, the Goulburn Broken CMA developed a process to engage the community in local planning so that the community could make informed decisions about the way forward for their community.  This process, and the actions that will now be carried out, is documented below.

From planning to Actions: Community Engagement in Local Planning

Planning within an uncertain future is inherently complex, as there are multiple, interconnected interactions between people, nature and the effects of a range of possible climate change scenarios.  Resilience theory can help us plan for change in a flexible and adaptive way and drives Goulburn Broken CMA planning processes.  Resilience theory explicitly recognizes that the community has a strong influence on natural resource management and that systems may change but we can manage for that change through adaptive planning.  The Goulburn Broken CMA is one of the first catchments (internationally?) to implement resilience theory.

A trial of a method to develop an adaptive local plan using the key concepts of resilience thinking and ‘Adaptation Pathways’ occurred in the UPland Slopes through  the ‘Bogies and Beyond’ project (Supported by the Goulburn Broken CMA through the State funded 'Our Catchments Our Communities' program).  This project updates this local plan through collaboration with the community, other agencies, Traditional Owners and Social Scientists (RMIT). There were two processes run concurrently, one in the Strathbogie Ranges and one in the Mansfield region.  This separation was necessary as although similar in community structure (lifelstylers and weekenders with some large, multi-generational farms), initial consultation showed that the Strathbogie ranges community have a very strong sense of  living in the 'bogies, while Mansfiled residents relate much more to the High Country and not at all to the Strathbogie Ranges.  The  community engagement process and priority actions for the Strathbogie Ranges and Mansfield region are outlined for each sub-system below.

Strathbogie Ranges

To update this plan, 25 residents for the Strathbogie Ranges involved in four workshops to develop priority actions. In the first workshop, the group discussed what they valued about the Strathbogie Ranges, and what supports those values.  This resulted in the identification of five critical attributes: 1. Productive land, 2. Water Quality and Flows, 3. native vegetation extent and quality,  4. Landscape diversity and 5. Belonging.  Workshop 2 discussed what is known about these attributes, how three different climate change scenarios may affect them, and the tipping points at which the systems are likely to transform (positively or negatively).  Workshop 3 and 4 developed priority actions for two of those critical attributes; 'water' and 'trees' that the group thought were the most critical to take action on now.  At the end of workshop 4, there were several community members who were keen to be on 'working groups' to develop a 'tree' project and a 'water' project. These are described below.

The Tree Storey: Growback or Dieback.

The 'tree' group's main concern was that the large old trees were shoing signs of dieback, with more dead limbs and death of trees. The group developed a citizen science project that is a 'Tree Health App' that can be used by the general community to monitor the health of their trees.  For more information go here https://www.gbcma.vic.gov.au/projects/bogies-and-beyond/tree-storey-citi...

'Water' project

The key outcome for the 'water' group was that the Strathbbogie Ranges community became more aware of thier water use so that demand did not exceed supply.  The group wanted to learn more about three key aspects of water:

1. Groundwater

2. Waterway flows (currently measured by GB CMA and GMW)

3. The effect of dams on water flows.

The group are working with Melbourne University to understand groundwater changes in the Sevens Creek catchment above the water storage 'Polly McQuinns).

Melbourne Unviersity will also look at how we might tackle the question about the effect of dams on water flows.

Mansfield's Future Matters

The ‘Mansfield’s Future Matters’ Local SES plan was developed through a number of activities that aimed to involve the community perspectives as much as possible.  Activities included workshops, attending existing meetings (eg Landcare Groups, Rotary), one on one interviews and on-line surveys. 

The draft vision for the area is:

A community that cares for the natural environment and its resources for production and tourism that is ready to respond to climate change through robust governance arrangements.

The realistaion of this vision is supported by 6 critical attributes:

  • Water – ground water, rainfall, catchment and rivers
  • Native vegetation – extent and quality, responses to extreme events (bushfires/floods)
  • Production and Farming – soils, planning for climate change, production commodities
  • Landscape amenity- wide open spaces, air quality, environmental resources (lakes, rivers)
  • Community – resilience to natural disasters, finding jobs, lifestyle, social/welfare divide.
  • Tourism

From these critical attributes, similar to the Strathbogie Ranges Groups. native vegetation and water wre seen as the priority focus for immediate action. The priority actions for each of these two critical attributes are outlined below:  

Native Vegetation Actions

Threat: A decrease in the number and health of paddock trees

Actions:

  • Increase landholder knowledge about the importance of paddock trees
  • Develop a resource and key messages to assist in understanding the role of paddock trees in the landscape
  • Develop the importance of “Nature @ work” principles in management of paddock trees
  • Increase the extent of paddock tree regeneration
  • Provide seedling paddock trees to reintegrate into the landscape
  • Provide opportunities/trials on best ways to fence paddock trees
  • Provide understorey plants to increase the resilience of paddock trees in the landscape
  • To develop biolinks for support of paddock trees

'Water' Actions

Threat: A decrease level of water in our rivers, lakes and dams and the resulting water quality as a result of climate change.

Actions:

  • Decrease the overall nutrient loads in our waterways
  • Provide an educative resource to assist landholders in understanding the economic value of riparian vegetation
  • Work with government and private land managers to continue integration of riparian areas
  • Increase resilient riparian flora species to create buffers
  • Provide small incentives for landholders wanting to revegetate riparian areas including ephemeral creeks and dams
  • Promote biolinks as riparian revegetation

The Challenges Ahead

Several connected drivers of change pose significant threats to this region’s ecosystem.
Climate variability led to unprecedented bushfires in 2006 and 2009, challenging the resilience of the area’s environment and people. The capacity of individuals and community organisations to address the legacy of these bushfires, as well as other challenges such as floods and drought, is of significant concern.
Populations of many native species of flora and fauna also remain vulnerable as a result of the bushfires.
Nutrient laden run-off as result of land-use changes, including agriculture practices and the increase in “lifestyle” developments is also significant.
Climate variability and stock and domestic demand is threatening groundwater yield particularly as lifestyle developments expand into the upper parts of this area.
Although water policy reforms are considering the suite of ecosystem services provided by waterways, regulation of the waterways for multiple purposes, especially downstream supply, limits operation of the waterways in terms of water quality and ecological benefits.
Constraints to the delivery of environmental water are being considered.
Although the Upland Slopes have large areas of native vegetation, especially on public land, agricultural practices and land-use changes, including subdivision, on private land is threatening to result in the crossing of several biodiversity habitat thresholds, especially fragmentation, connectivity and fire frequency, and riparian width thresholds (for cleaning water).
Short-term agricultural production objectives (i.e. to produce more and different crops) and long-term native biodiversity objectives (i.e. establish corridors of vegetation) are not always easy to align in this area and there is risk that managing this may be made more difficult by drivers of change such as climate variability and increased farm production.
Land-use changes and the make-up of the population, including absentee landownership of near 50 per cent in some local government areas is creating difficulty in establishing networks between communities and agencies and reinforcing accountabilities at all levels.

Actions and Effort - Embed the resilience approach

*Progress rating is an indictaive qualitative assessment, these wil be further refined through data analysis, stakeholder and community consultation.

Strategic priority: Update and develop strategies

Responsibility

RCS Actions

Effort 

Progress*

Case Studies

Review and update existing strategic documents and sub-strategies and create new ones according to need. Convert strategic plans to action plans that have meaning at the local level (WS)

Goulburn Broken CMA Biodiversity Strategy 2015-2020

Strathbogie Ranges Conservation Management Network Strategic Plan

Strathbogie Ranges Planning through Bogies and Beyond - Workshop notes attached.

Support community groups to develop their own strategies in light of larger ones e.g. RCS

Strategic priority: Plan at social-ecological system scale

Responsibility

        

RCS Actions

Effort

Progress*

Case Studies

Develop an adaptive planning process for social-ecological systems to build and enhance their resilience   New strategies to manage and monitor roadside native vegetation (balance between environment and safety) (WS)

Strathbogie Ranges Roadside Management Plan

Bogies and Beyond planning recognsied 5 critical attributes: water, native vegetation, landscape diversity, belonging and production values.  Thresholds for each are being explored.

Build more of an understanding of resilience theory amongst agency staff and key stakeholders (WS)
  Develop community based processes for understanding, measuring and planning NRM activities (WS)  

"Safer Together' fire plan being developed by DELWP with community, CFA and GB CMA

GB CMA EOI Process online

Citizen science project: Tree Storey; Growback or dieback?

Water project: 3B: Bores, Bogs and Barriers.

Strategic priority: Provide adaptive management and leadership

Responsibiltiy

           

RCS Actions

Effort

Progress*

Case Studies

Build community and agency capacity to respond together to drivers of change

Education in schools so that we continue to develop a generation of concerned agriculturalists and environmentalists (WS)

UGLN are working with schools to develop generational understanding of NRM (WS)

Strathbogie Ranges CMN new landholder days where community leaders are informing new and small landholders about NRM practices.

Community Network leaders continue to be supported through forums such as Land and Biodiversity Implementation Forum (LaBIF)

To build community leaders with support from agencies so that local people can make changes locally (WS)
Education, training and leadership program for community NRM volunteers and staff (WS)
     
Research resilience knowledge gaps to inform decision making based on thresholds and tipping points Ensure that a well-planned and coordinated monitoring approach is in place in order to learn and apply learning’s  Citizen science projects are monitoring tree health, bores (water table depth) and Greater Glider distribution and abundance.  

Actions and Effort - To Strengthen Partnerships

Watere*Progress rating is an indictaive qualitative assessment, these wil be further refined through data analysis, stakeholder and community consultation.

Strategic priority: Reinforce relationships between agencies and industry

Responsibility

RCS Actions

Effort 

Progress*

Case Studies

Define roles and reslationships with regional delivery partnersProvide opportunities for knowledge sharing so that knowledge stays in and benefits the region (WS)Facilitators Network Meetings chaired by the GB CMA Landcare Coordinator are held quarterly
 
 
 
Weed Network group facilitated by Up2Us brings together agencies that manage weeds to ensure a coordinated approach

Strategic priority: Manage Public land collabratively

Responsibility

      

RCS Actions

Effort

Progress*

Case Studies

Undertake works on public land and Crown land frontages to improve waterways and wetlands Promote ongoing relationships between public land managers and other stakeholders (WSStrathbogie Streams Project (GB CMA Waterways and Wetland Health team) is prioviding funding for waterways and riparian wetlands in the Strathbogie Ranges.
Value ecosystem services provided by forested public land and manage for multiple benefits e.g. water quality and quantity, carbon storage, tourism and recreation (WS)
Collaborate with Traditional Owners in catchment managementInvestigate employment opportunities for TO in NRM (WS) Tuangurung Clans now employ on-country workers directly to deliver GB CMA project 'Nationally Significant Ecosystems' Alpine Bogs management.

Actions and Effort - Adapt to land-use change

*Progress rating is an indictaive qualitative assessment, these wil be further refined through data analysis, stakeholder and community consultation.

Strategic priority: Capture opportuntites from land development

Responsibility

      

RCS Actions

Effort 

Progress*

Case Studies

Plan land-use to minimise loss of biodiversityIdentify high value assets and potential biodiversity corridors in lifestyle areas and assist local government in the development of appropriate tools to include biodiversity in planning decisions (RCS
                                
SoilCare grants in the region can improve knowledge of how to tackle erosion
Address erosion, sedimentation and other pollution sources to waterways (RWS)
Business case for native vegetation offsetting developed by Biosis
Assist local government to develop and apply appropriate planning tools for all council plans and strategies (e.g. Municipal Strategic Statement review, policies, & overlays) to increase the protection and reduce risks to biodiversity (e.g., matching land use intensity to land characteristics) (BS 2010)
Strategic Land use planning for native vegetation off setting – Local Government over the counter Native Vegetation off setting program (WS)
Strategic Land use planning for native vegetation off setting – Local Government over the counter Native Vegetation off setting program (WS)
Manage public land to minimise loss of biodiversityPartner agencies to become more involved in meetings that are making land management decisions (RCS)
Our Catchments Our Community projects developed with Goulburn Broken Partnership team.
Influence forest management including timber harvesting to achieve improved biodiversity outcomes, when opportunities arise such as during reviews of relevant state legislation and policy. Work with local forest planners (BS 2010)Strathbogie Forests Alliance changed the fire plan for Strathbogie Ranges in 2015, dramatically reducing the area to be burned for fuel reduction.
Promote land-use capability assessments and implementation, including use and management of waterPromote Whole Farm Planning program (including as a way to better protect biodiversity) (CNRMAP 2013) 
Incorporate into the Victorian Planning provisions the requirement for land management plans to be provided as subdivision stage (WS

Strategic priority: Plan for and manage floods

Responsibility

       

RCS Actions

Effort

Progress*

Case Studies

Understand more about the nature of flooding to manage its impact on the natural and built environmentsDemonstrate and education on the benefits of wetlands for flood mitigation (WS)
Updated Flood Overlay for Mansifield.
 

 

Actions and Effort - Adapt to water policy reform

*Progress rating is an indictaive qualitative assessment, these wil be further refined through data analysis, stakeholder and community consultation.

Strategic priority: Influence regional water policy

Responsibility

RCS Actions

Effort 

Progress*

Case Studies

Influence water policy development and implementation to secure water for improving natural asset condition and social and economic wellbeingContinued community, DEPI, Goulburn Broken CMA, industry and water authority partnerships to provide balanced and informed input into policy development (RCS) 
 
Work with Goulburn Murray Water and DEPI to integrate the management of surface and ground water for the benefit of groundwater dependent ecosystems and aquatic species and communities.

GMW groundwater management plan sets limits for extraction.

Mansfield Shire Council domestic waste water plan adopted. 53 actions to be implemented. No funding to do so (WS)

Set limits for extraction in the Strathbogie Ranges including from waterways, ground water, bogs and via farm dams. There is a need to be supported by education and science. 
Create opportunities for community leaders to contribute to water policyIdentify and manage key areas likely to provide refuge in the face of climate change, including the prioritisation of wetlands for environmental watering.
 Strathbogie Ranges Bores working group are developing a 'water table model' for the Sevens Creek catchment in collaboration with Melbourne University, to understand and predict changes in water table depths.
 
    

Strategic priority: Deliver water to waterways and wetlands

Responsibility

     

RCS Actions

Effort

Progress*

Case Studies

Plan, deliver and monitor environmental water delivery to improve the condition of priority waterways and wetlandsCommunicate with landholders, use their in depth knowledge to guide decision making (WS)Gecko Clan are working with the community on 'Water budgeting' including increasing knowledge of evaporation from dams.
  
   

Strategic priority: Use water efficiently on farms

Responsibility

     

RCS Actions

Effort

Progress*

Case Studies

Modernise water delivery on irrigated land to provide ecological and productivity benefitsSupport planning for water management to secure water for agricultural production (WS) 
 
    

Actions and Effort - Adapt to climate variability

u*Progress rating is an indictaive qualitative assessment, these wil be further refined through data analysis, stakeholder and community consultation.

Strategic priority: Adapt to climate variability risk

Responsibility

   

RCS Actions

Effort 

Progress*

Case Studies

Factor risk of climate variability and identify adaptation strategies in Goulburn Broken CMA and partner plans The 'Our Catchments Our Communities' 'Bogies and Beyond Project is working with community to deliver on-ground works to protect and enahnce large old trees.  A citizen science project to determine and monitor tree health is being implemented.
 The 'Our Catchments Our Communities' 'Bogies and Beyond Project is working with community to deliver on-ground works to protect and enhance waterways.  A model will be devleoped by Melbourne University to identify how the Sevens Creek catchment responds to rainfall events.
Biodiversity fund (Federal Government funded) has resulted in 750 hecatres under 10 year agreements for revegetation and remnant protection (2012-2017).  This is significant landholder action in protecting and restoring biodiversity. Demand continues to be greater than supply. (WS)
Increase landscape connectivity (WS)
 
 
 
Factor risks to natural assets into public land fire management plansEnsure information about high priority biodiversity assets is considered by fire-fighting authorities prior to and during wildfires. (BS 2010)
DELWP facilitating 'Saafer Together' meetings to develop fire risk management plans with the community.  Input includes consideeration of high biodiversity value sites.
  

Strategic priority: Respond and recover from climatic events

Responsibility

  

RCS Actions

Effort

Progress*

Case Studies

Plan and implement flood, fire and drought response and recovery 

GB CMA is developing more accurate flood mapping to better inform community of likely impacts from high rainfall events.

Identify where agencies and community can have influence and build partnerships with public land managers (RCS)
Reduce the impact of flooding on Urban Centres including Taggerty, Acheron, Alexandra, Molesworth, Yea, Thornton, Eildon and Mansfield (IFS 2014)
Ensure proactive rather than reactive approach based on science and including natural asset protection (WS)
 DELWP facilitating 'Saafer Together' meetings to develop fire risk management plans with the community. 
  

Strategic priority: Capture opportunities from a low carbon future

Responsibility

  

RCS Actions

Effort

Progress*

Case Studies

Identify where carbon sequestration activities provide environmental, economic and social benefitsResearch and clear communication needed so that it can be incorporated into community planning (WS)Biodiversity Fund (federal Government) provides potential opportunities for participating landholders to investigate and participate in any future  carbon markets.
    

Actions and Effort - To adapt to increased farm production

*Progress rating is an indictaive qualitative assessment, these wil be further refined through data analysis, stakeholder and community consultation.

Strategic priority: Manage risk to agricultural production

Responsibility

    

RCS Actions

Effort 

Progress*

Case Studies

 Research and development in utilising integrated and new approaches for managing risks to agriculture (WS)Drought stock containment grants
Continue to deliver soil erosion remediation works (WS) 
 
 
 

Strategic priority: Establish sustainable agricultural practices

Responsibility

    

RCS Actions

Effort

Progress*

Case Studies

Create awareness and acceptance of sustainable management practices to improve land and soil conditionEducate landowners of their responsibilities (WS)
Gecko Clan is practising mosaic burning with Yorta Yorta 
Develop a series of workshops for landholders with holding under 250 acres on soil health, weed management and ID, fire prevention and planning (WS)
Encourage research and development of small acreage farming so that regional production is enhanced despite sub-division of land (WS)

The GB CMA SoilCare program promotes 100% ground cover all year round. 

Embrace new sustainable technologies/land use modelling systems (WSThe GB CMA SoilCare Program have run a series of forums highlighting the importance of organic matter in the soil, Composting and high level speakers promote whole of farm practices.

Strategic priority: Increace biodiversity in agricultural landuse

Responsibility

  

RCS Actions

Effort

Progress*

Case Studies

Create awareness and acceptance of land management practices that protect and improve terrestrial and aquatic habitatIncrease biodiversity along minor waterways for benefits downstream (WS)

Strathbogies Streams Project provided funding to community to deliver grants to non-priority streams.

Quantify and educate landholders regarding production benefits of good riparian management. Also need to secure funding to implement (WS)
Use the vast knowledge of aging agency staff to educate landholders about the benefits to productive farming when biodiversity is increased. Often incentive are need for practise change (WS)
 
Identify environmental stewardship opportunities for land managersDevelop an education campaign that focuses on increasing knowledge and acceptance of the need for biodiversity conservation (RCSCOmmunity Groups have recieved threatened speciees funding for Owls, Brush-tailed Phascogales, Striped Legelss Lizard and Golden Sun Moth (State Funding 2016)
Provide incentives for landholder stewardship (active management for conservation) (BS 2010)Incentives provided through Federal Funding (Biodiversity Fund) and National Landcare Programme.
Promote benefits of strategic, whole-of-farm grazing management that promote both biodiversity and production (Apply learning’s from previous projects such as the Farm Business and Biodiversity Project, Green Graze, and Hill Country Environmental Management Incentives) (BS 2010) 
Work with landholders to protect and improve biodiversity on private land and build understanding of its contribution to sustainable and profitable farmingProvide landholders with information and/or incentives to improve the condition of terrestrial, riparian and wetland habitat (RCS) Booklet produced: "Healthy Hectares.  A guide for small landholders to create productive and environmentally sustainable properties'
 Manage erosion so that sediment load is reduced and productive land maintained (WS) 
   

Additional Actions and Effort

• Community keen to see forestry undertaken sustainably (L&B Team engagement engagement)
• Use biodiversity information and knowledge to identify spatial priorities at the  landscape-scale (e.g. existing and proposed bio links) (BS 2010)
• Some community concern over the economic impact of native animals on agriculture e.g., Kangaroos (L&B Team engagement)
• Community keen to see government take action on landholders undertaking poor land management practise particularly where they impact on others (L&B Team engagement)
• Undertaken pest plant and animal actions e.g. Blackberries, Paterson’s Curse, Bridal Creeper, Foxes, Goats and Rabbits (L&B Team engagement, CNRMAP 2013)
• International investors buying up arable land purely for long term investment (WS)

Deer are becoming more of an issue.