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Goulburn Broken Catchment Management Strategy

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Local Plans

Local Plan - Agricultural Floodplain

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The Shepparton Irrigation Land and Water Management Plan 2016-2020 provides the basis for the Agricultural Floodplain Local Plan.  The Land and Water Management Plan will be released in early 2016.

This Shepparton Irrigation Region Land and Water Management Plan (SIRLWMP) is the fourth update of the adaptive 30-year plan first prepared in 1989 (GBSPPAC 1989). It lists priority interventions for the next five years to shore up the natural base of soils, water and biodiversity. So far, Governments have invested $450 million in implementing the plan. The investment by the local community is more than double this amount (GBCMA 2011). 

The focus on managing the natural base evolved from an emphasis on the single threat of salinity in the 1980s to integrated catchment management in the mid-1990s, to valuing total benefits via ‘ecosystem services’ (such as maintaining productive soils and clean water) in the early 2000s, to the resilience of complex systems of people and nature from 2005.

Plan implementation results directly in works on-the-ground and increases regional resilience by connecting stakeholders: the plan and its resulting processes influence how stakeholders invest, impacting positively on natural resources.


Building on three decades of lessons and achievements, this version of the plan identifies the next phase of critical actions by bringing into sharp focus the features of the region and its people that make it a stand-out in terms of natural and other competitive advantages.
While the community-agency partnership model fostered during development and implementation of the 1989 plan remains a feature today, this update also highlights the importance of linking long-term management of natural resources more directly with the business of food production.

While the community-agency partnership model fostered during development and implementation of the 1989 plan remains a feature today, this update also highlights the importance of linking long-term management of natural resources more directly with the business of food production.
This update also lays down a clearer pathway between the complex system of people and nature and what needs to be done to make the regional system resilient. The plan identifies five critical attributes that underpin the functioning of the SIR as a system and therefore need to be targeted for action to improve or maintain. Eight priorities have been identified to guide actions in meeting goals for these critical attributes.

The Shepparton Irrigation Region People and Planning Integration Committee (SIRPPIC), which includes community and agency stakeholders, plays a key role in setting direction, monitoring implementation of this plan and adapting it to changed circumstances, on behalf of the Goulburn Broken Catchment Management Authority Board (GBCMA).
 

Figure 1. Planning hierarchy showing how goals are achieved by implementing priorities


This is the last update of the original 30-year plan: consistent with the ‘resilience approach’, the plan is dynamic and will undergo a major review in 2020.
The SIRLWMP is one of several ‘sub-strategies’ that guide implementation of the overarching and adaptive Goulburn Broken Region Catchment Strategy (GBCMA 2013). The SIRLWMP also satisfies Victorian Government land and water management plan guidelines for irrigation areas (DSE 2008).